Take A Look At A Selection of Our Favourite Artists From Our Isle of Wight 2018 Coverage

This year’s Isle of Wight Festival has afforded us some fantastic opportunities to interview and introduce to you some amazing artists.

For all of the achievements that the Isle of Wight has gained, it is the ability to draw in a crowd that has a distinct love of emerging talent which is often its main attraction. In order to get this talent in front of a wider audience, we created five quick-fire questions and emailed out in the hundreds to artists in order to put together articles that would give festival goers and fans alike further insight into this year’s selections.

In order to help steady those festival blues on a rather beautiful British Tuesday, let’s look back at some of the best answers that we received from this year’s Isle of Wight Festival. Also, focusing on elements that artists themselves can take away with them.


Alex Ohm

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Image Credit: Luke Jones

In one of our first features for our buildup, we featured Alex Ohm. Alex’s alternative, cinematic symphonies reflect the full range of influences that inspire his work and come together to create his unique sound. Fresh from the Midlands, Alex has become a renowned name on the local music scene who is currently writing and recording new material to release later this year.

Isle of Wight Build Up // Arno Carstens // Luna Tear // Anavae // deVience // Hashtag // Freazy // Alex Ohm // Rival Bones // Glass Peaks // Noble Jacks //

Alex first came to our attention with his track ‘Fractures (Little Wonder)‘. We will be doing a review on this in the future, but take our word for it, you need it in your life!

We feel that it is vital for artists to take a read of the answers throughout this interview. Reminding you that sometimes just taking the moment as it is will be your best preparation. Alex has a fantastic mindset when it comes to his performances, something that shows in the wisdom of his answers.

How would you describe yourself as a band for those who haven’t heard of you?

Alex Ohm: “That’s a tricky one. I always say come and find out for yourself. Imagine The War on Drugs wrestling Alt J with Hans Zimmer as the ref, and you’re getting close.”

How are you feeling in the build-up to your performance?

Alex Ohm: “We can’t wait! This is our first major festival ever in England, and we’re all feeling pretty electric about it! What a line up to be part of as well! We’re looking forward to sharing our songs with a whole new bunch of people.”

What sort of preparation do you have as an artist for a festival the size of this?

Alex Ohm: “No preparation as such other than playing gigs in the run-up to it. I’m not sure you can prepare as such. When you get onto the stage in that sort of setting you just get immersed in it and whatever happens, happens. We’ve recently played London and Liverpool with Pirate Studios, which was good as we were playing to new crowds. We’ve got a hometown festival in the Midlands coming up next Saturday too which will be our warm up so to speak.”

Who are you most looking forward to seeing at the festival?

Alex Ohm: “That list could go on and on. Kasabian always on puts a mega live show. They always get the crowd buzzing. The Hacienda Classical set would be good to catch too. I like writing with orchestras in mind, and when I first heard The Hacienda Classical, the hairs on my arm stood up. On the day we play, The Killers and Travis are playing, that’ll be a top way to round the weekend up.

Personally, I’m looking forward to catching some of the up and coming bands on the This Feeling with Pirate Studios and Pretty Green stage. It will be good to see The Surrenders, Sugarthief, The Assist, Red Rum Club, Yves, The Seamonsters and too many others to name tear it up.”


Glass Peaks

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Image Credit: Ant Adams Photography

Glass Peaks are a trio that most readers of Nexus will be familiar with. We have been fans of the lads since way back (no lie either, we are talking way back, even before the blog started) and were thrilled that they had been given the chance to showcase their talent at Isle of Wight Festival 2018.

The trio featured in our early festival build up article:

Isle of Wight Build Up // Arno Carstens // Luna Tear // Anavae // deVience // Hashtag // Freazy // Alex Ohm // Rival Bones // Glass Peaks // Noble Jacks //

As a bit of background on Glass Peaks, The band’s 2017 breakout single, ‘I’m Okay’, hit the “Indie List” on Spotify for four weeks catching the attention of listeners everywhere.

The band gave us an insightful interview, specifically highlighting important aspects of festivals and organisation in general for artists. With a heavy focus needing to be placed on admin,  this allows the avoidance issues that might otherwise arise on the day of travel.

How would you describe yourself as an artist/band for those who haven’t heard of you?

Jake: “Three idiots who write passionate melodic music in a shed in Welling, Kent.”

Grant: “This is always a hard one to answer. I would have to go with if Foals and Radiohead had a baby.”

Alfie: “An angsty teenager who can cut absolute shapes in a funky, funky disco.”

How are you feeling in the build-up to your performance at the Isle of Wight?

Jake: “We are absolutely stoked to play the Isle Of Wight Festival. It’s always been a dream of mine, at age 12 the first album I bought was Jimi Hendrix live at the Isle Of Wight. I played it so much that it wouldn’t play anymore from all the scratches. I actually went to the festival in 2016 and it was amazing. Such a great festival.”

Grant: “Excited! As Jake said, some of our heroes have played this festival, and we’re honoured to have the opportunity to play. Big thanks to the peeps at This Feeling and Pirate Studios also. They’re all great guys, and we aim to smash it out the park!”

Alfie: “Yeah, we’re definitely very excited about this one. Isle Of Wight has a rich history of incredible musical performances. It’ll be nice to get on stage and do our thing.”

What sort of preparation do you have as an artist for a festival of this size?

Jake: “Lots of practice, sorting tracks, booking the van, buying beers, buying a tent, buying beers, sorting the ferry and buying more beer.”

Grant: “Exactly what Jake said. Lots of practice, making sure everything is as smooth as it possibly can be, oh and buying beers.”

Alfie: “Practice, practice, practice! We’re putting a lot of energy and time into perfecting the set and the sound. The admin stuff is also super important, we almost never had any transport because we were so hell-bent on making sure the music was the best it can be!”

Who are you most looking forward to seeing at the festival?

Jake: “Kasabian, Nile Rogers, Liam Gallagher, Wild Front, Blossoms, Travis, Submariner and The Killers.”

Grant: “The lineup all over the festival is wicked, but I’m looking forward to Travis, Chase and Status, Sheryl Crow and our boys, Submariner.”

Alfie: “Always Chase and Status – legends in the game. I’m excited to see Kara Marni, Depeche Mode and Nile Rodgers and Chic. Gonna be madness.”

Who do you feel should be on the lineup for next year?

Jake: “The 1975, Foals, The Stone Roses, Tears for Fears, Radiohead and Glass Peaks, obviously.”

Alfie: “If all of Jake’s suggestions make next years line up, I will cry little tears of joy. How wonderful.”


Proletariat

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Image Credit: David Gleave

While Manchester has always been a city synonymous with music, its punk scene has always played second or indeed third string to its more indie-orientated output. Enter Proletariat, a band who’ve been doing the rounds for just sixteen months, and who successfully bridge the gap between the snarling swagger of ‘70s punk and the effortless cool of contemporary indie.

We featured Proletariat for the first time during our series of interviews for Isle of Wights. The band themselves haven’t been together for very long but have made significant strides towards becoming even more established amongst the various emerging artists that the industry is currently producing.

Isle of Wight Build Up // Apollo Junction // Proletariat // Romances // Tasha Leaper As Madonna // Reminders // King Kuna // Tuba Libres // Jordan Allen // 3 Daft Monkeys // Mad King Ludwig and The Mojo Co.

They were personally asked to support Cabbage on tour and sold out their headline show at both the Soup Kitchen and the Deaf Institue. With this being their first and biggest show to date, we thought it would be great to revisit the questions to give other artists an idea of what the band got up to in preparation for the festival.

How would you describe yourself as an artist/band for those who haven’t heard of you?

Proletariat: “We’re a group that consists of four young lads with plenty to say, plenty of passion, and a hunger to go far and wide to spread our message.”

How are you feeling in the build-up to your performance at the Isle of Wight?

Proletariat: “We can’t wait! It’ll be the biggest bill we’ve ever been a part of, and we’re honoured to be asked to step out onto that stage at one the country’s greatest ever festivals. Just looking at the lineup, we see names that influence us straight away such as Liam Gallagher and Kasabian – it’s a crazy, crazy feeling knowing our name will appear on the same poster as some true icons. Now we’ve got to prove we’re worthy of it.”

What sort of preparation do you have as an artist for a festival of this size?

Proletariat: “To be honest we’ve been working our arses off, but we always have. In the two weeks running up to the festival, we’ll have rehearsed for nine days, but there’s something about that garage when we’re in there. It’s not like rehearsals, every time it’s like a live show; maybe that comes down to the intensity of our songs. All the hours are worth it, we can see the huge progression we’re making ourselves regarding our set, the songs and how tight we are together. It’s vital we’re all on the same page, on and off stage, that’s how people grow to love you.”

Who are you most looking forward to seeing at the festival?

Proletariat: “It’s got to be Liam Gallagher, there’s not really anyone like him is there; and we’re not just saying that because we’re from Manchester. The way he can own the stage without moving more than a metre each way is spectacular. We had the pleasure of seeing him at the Manchester Arena last year, and the sound was great, the presence was great, and he got 21,000 people together in unison.”

Who do you feel should be on the lineup for next year?

Proletariat: “I think it’s time Arctic Monkeys headlined the festival, I don’t think they ever have? I’d love to see someone like the Stones perform their legendary set on the stage. And for the final headliner, I’d love to see either Pearl Jam or Rage Against The Machine, even if that’s a very slim chance. Regarding other bands, I’d give the nod to the likes of Shame, Slaves, Miles Kane, Iggy Pop, DMA’s, Baxter Dury, Queen’s of the Stone Age, The Hives… and us hopefully!”


Jordan Allen

Jordan Allen Band Photo
Credit: PhotographyGaz.co

Jordan Allen is made up of the formidable talents of Danny Quin (guitar), Kieran (bass), and Nathan Howard (drums), the band also boast an Ace amongst their hand with charismatic frontman and lyricist Jordan Allen. Guided by the esteemed Brontone Management (Muse, The Pogues, Pulled Apart by Horses), the band retreated to Peter Gabriel’s infamous Real World Studios where they spent a fruitful spell sowing the first seeds of their back catalogue.

Throughout the articles that we released regarding the Isle of Wight Festival, one factor remained a constant. The fact that each artist has an advised, unique approach to the festival performance itself. Jordan Allen discussed, amongst other things, the importance of having a confidence in yourself and having a strong focus on who you are as an artist.

Isle of Wight Build Up // Apollo Junction // Proletariat // Romances // Tasha Leaper As Madonna // Reminders // King Kuna // Tuba Libres // Jordan Allen // 3 Daft Monkeys // Mad King Ludwig and The Mojo Co.

How would you describe yourself as an artist/band for those who haven’t heard of you?

Jordan Allen: “Four lads from Bolton with lyrically driven indie anthems.”

How are you feeling in the build-up to your performance at the Isle of Wight?

Jordan Allen: “Very excited, we feel more than ready to headline after starting at the bottom of the bill last year. We’re gonna take the roof off!”

What sort of preparation do you have as an artist for a festival of this size?

Jordan Allen: “Gigs. Gigs. Gigs. It’s all about refining the set and being confident in what you do and that you can be the best band of the weekend for the people that watch you. The other artists on the bill don’t phase us.”

Who are you most looking forward to seeing at the festival?

Jordan Allen: “Buzzing to watch our mates Vida, but obviously, Kasabian is gonna be mega too! Watched them support Oasis at Heaton Park about ten years ago and they blew Oasis off the stage.”

Who do you feel should be on the lineup for next year?

Jordan Allen: “I think they always do a great job at the Isle of Wight. I’d love to see Baxter Dury up there next year. I think he’s massively underrated!”


Germein

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Image credit to Israel Baldago Photography

Germein is an Australian indie pop rock sibling band comprising of sisters Georgia (guitar), Ella (bass and electric cello) and Clara Germein (drums). Whether jamming together at their home in the Adelaide Hills, playing alongside Arcade Fire and Catfish and the Bottlemen at the Isle of Wight festival, or opening UK stadium shows for Little Mix, it’s their mutual connection to music that has seen them make their mark in music.

Germein are one of the artists who are uniquely placed amongst those who we interviewed for our build-up as they have appeared at the Isle of Wight Festival for the past three years. With consistency being key, it is perhaps the humble nature and natural talent of the trio that keeps them firmly amongst any selections for the festival line-up. As we look back over the answers, it’s easy to see how having personal qualities shine through as an artist can complement the talent which is already apparent in the music which is produced. The trio featured in our build-up article placed below.

Isle of Wight Build Up // Gypsyfingers // Avocado Sunrise // Germein Sisters // The Optimists // CAVALCADE // L. // BREED // Marlee King // Saint Apache // Swan Levitt.

How would you describe yourself as an artist/band for those who haven’t heard of you?

Georgia: “We’re a sibling indie rock pop band from Australia. I play guitar and keys, Ella plays bass and electric cello, and Clara plays the drums.”

How are you feeling in the build-up to your performance at the Isle of Wight?

Georgia: “We absolutely love the UK, and are so excited to be heading back this summer. Once we board the Qantas flight from Australia to London, the reality really sets in. We’ve been lucky enough to play at the Isle of Wight Festival for the last three years, and it’s always such a blast. The island itself is so beautiful, and the atmosphere of the festival is just so unique. We’re feeling very excited as always, and just can’t wait to hit the stage and play our music! It’s especially an honour to be on the bill for the 50th Anniversary of the Isle of Wight!”

What sort of preparation do you have as an artist for a festival of this size?

Georgia: “We always try to put on the very best performance we can for every show we play, whether it’s to forty people or 40,000 people, so the Isle of Wight will be no exception! We rehearse regularly leading up to the day so we can be as best prepared as possible. As well as playing mostly original songs, we try to throw in a cover song or mashup of songs that will relate to the audiences we’re playing to or a song in the local language. Keep an ear out for the special song we’ve got planned for the Isle of Wight!”

Who are you most looking forward to seeing at the festival?

Georgia: “We grew up listening to a lot of Van Morrison with our Dad, so we definitely look forward to seeing him play. We also can’t wait to see The Script, Jessie J, James Bay, The Killers, Hudson Taylor and The Wombats, James Walsh and Bang Bang Romeo –  there are so many amazing artists to choose from!”

Who do you feel should be on the lineup for next year?

Georgia: “We’d love to see U2 on the main stage, love their music and message. We met Bono in Adelaide about ten years ago – what a legend. To play a show with them would be the ultimate!”


CAVALCADE

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Image Credit: Jeff Moh

CAVALCADE is a four-piece indie alternative rock band from Barking, London.  Jack Campbell (vocals and guitar), Connor Duggan (vocals and guitar), Tom Nunn (bass), and Steve Norris (drums) recently played Camden Rocks and are featured in our Camden Rocks Build Up- Article 6.

CAVALCADE switched up their sound in 2017 which has been one stand out factor in their meteoric rise in the last year and ending with them now having played Isle of Wight Festival. The band are always happy to have their personality come through in interviews, conversations and their performances. Creating something raw, real and likeable which is one of the reasons that we are such fans of them here at Nexus. Their latest track Anita has caused quite the stir, and rightly so, be sure to take a read of our review: CAVALCADE Provide Startling Performance on Latest Track ‘Anita’

How would you describe yourself as an artist/band for those who haven’t heard of you?

Connor: “Catchy tunes, and a whole lot of fun complete with shit jokes.”

Jack: “Musically, I’d say we’re quite difficult to sum up, although someone recently reviewed our live set saying that we play punky alternative/indie rock that has a bit of a retro sound – which I think is a pretty accurate observation. But yeah, generally we’re a bunch of twats with guitars and fantastically shit jokes.”

Tom: “I’d say we’re an indie band with a bit of a rockier edge. We’re sometimes compared to the early Arctic Monkeys sound or Catfish and the Bottlemen.”

How are you feeling in the build-up to your performance at the Isle of Wight?

Connor: “Feels like I’m going on holiday! Having attended festivals for the last eight years or something, it’s a dream come true. We’ve also got a massive new tune to show off, so it’s the perfect place to debut it!”

Tom: “Buzzing is the only word to describe it really – I’m so excited. The Isle of Wight was next on my list of festivals to go to, and the fact that I’m going and playing is madness.”

What sort of preparation do you have as an artist for a festival of this size?

Connor: “We’ve been focusing on getting the set as tight as possible. What it all comes down to is what kind of show we put on. We want people to remember us, so I’ve been practising by jumping off of the toilet into the bath.”

Jack: “Yeah, just practising the set and the live performance as much as possible really. Steve enjoys playing the drums with one hand while drinking beer with the other, so I reckon we’ll try and sneak that in.”

Who are you most looking forward to seeing at the festival?

Connor: “I’m looking forward to seeing Kasabian again, and LG goes without saying. Chic are fucking great live, so I’ll be wiggling my hips full force for them, and defo some Soul II Soul. Other than that I’m really looking forward to seeing the bands we’re playing alongside in the This Feeling tent. We saw Hey Charlie at their gig in 2018 earlier in the year, so I’m super excited to see them again.”

Jack: “I’m proper buzzing for Chic. I saw their Glastonbury set on TV a couple of years ago and it just looked top. As Connor said, LG goes without saying, and it’ll be my first time seeing him live. Regarding This Feeling bands, it has to be Himalayas, Hey Charlie and Avalanche Party.”

Tom: “The mighty Liam G, Nile Rodgers and Chic, and T-Rextasy.

Who do you feel should be on the lineup for next year?

Connor: “Us.”


Marlee King

 

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Image Credit: Christie Goodwin

 

An Isle of Wight native, Marlee King, is a promising young musician currently based in London after completing her university degree in graphics and media design. She is working on releasing her own material and playing as many gigs as she can. With the Royal Albert Hall, Indig02 and Bestival under her belt, it’s no wonder that Isle of Wight wanted to place her on the line-up.

Marlee King is still developing as an artist. Being from the Isle of Wight, she is able to capture the excitement that comes with a performance at a festival that she has grown up around. It’s a special moment for an artist that is sure to produce excellent material in the future, material that we will be waiting eagerly to review.

Isle of Wight Build Up // Gypsyfingers // Avocado Sunrise // Germein Sisters // The Optimists // CAVALCADE // L. // BREED // Marlee King // Saint Apache // Swan Levitt.

How would you describe yourself as an artist/band for those who haven’t heard of you?

Marlee King: “I find it hard to describe what sort of artist I am when I am still trying to figure that out myself. At the moment, I play a lot of covers, but give them my own little twist. I’m quite rhythmic with my guitar playing, and I keep trying to push what that can be. People can expect to hear me play a wide range of songs from artists like Katy Perry to Joni Mitchell with funky little re-works!”

How are you feeling in the build-up to your performance at the Isle of Wight?

Marlee King: “Excited! Its always such a joy to come back to the Island and perform. I’m bringing out the electric guitar for this one to add a new dimension to what I play, so that’ll be fun.”

What sort of preparation do you have as an artist for a festival of this size?

Marlee King: “I try to approach it the same way as any performance, not to overthink or over-rehearse the set; no rock and roll partying the night before! In all seriousness, the not overthinking part is the main thing for me. It makes it easier to get up in front of people and just enjoy playing the music with no worries.”

Who are you most looking forward to seeing at the festival?

Marlee King: “As well as Nile Rodgers and Chic, Wild Front and Rothwell are two of my favourite acts that will be playing Saturday afternoon on the main stage and big top. I had the pleasure of seeing them in London, and they are fantastic. The Wild Front lads are such a tight band, and Rothwell is a total babe with a killer voice so check them out if you can!”

Who do you feel should be on the lineup for next year?

Marlee King: “Any of my music idols that haven’t played it yet? I was six when David Bowie played, and unfortunately missed that! It would be so cool to see St. Vincent on the main stage.”


Hannah Paris

 

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Image Credit: Hannah Paris

 

Hannah Paris is a UK country pop artist and also fronts a five-piece country rock band of the same name. Hannah is making big waves in the UK country scene having enjoyed extensive radio play around Europe. Her music had over 100,000 streams on Spotify, which is almost unheard of for an unsigned artist. She spent 2018 writing new material, which moved away from her earlier ballads to a rockier sound and has gone down very well with her audiences in recent live shows.

It’s important to highlight Hannah as an example for all aspiring and emerging artists. Unsigned and completely making her journey her own. It’s impressive, to say the least, and is a notable achievement for anyone to attract over 100,00 streams on Spotify, let alone someone who is unsigned. Be sure to take a read of Hannahs interview below.

Isle of Wight Build Up // Bad Day Blues Band // KilliT // The RPMs // The Scruff // The Velvet Hands // Sugarthief // Hannah Paris // Real Dead Ringer // Yves // The Black Roses //

How would you describe yourself as an artist/band for those who haven’t heard of you?

Hannah: “My sound is tricky to pigeonhole, but I guess it’s best described as a blend of modern Nashville country music and Southern rock. It has evolved over the last twelve months as this time last year I was a solo artist playing my first festival spots on acoustic stages. So, big changes.”

How are you feeling in the build-up to your performance at the Isle of Wight?

Hannah: “A combination of excitement and anticipation. I rarely feel nervous performing, and I don’t feel nervous at the moment as we have had good preparation, but I am sure it will kick in a little as we get closer to the event.”

What sort of preparation do you have as an artist for a festival of this size?

Hannah: “That’s a great question. We are trying to play as many gigs as possible, but it’s impossible to try to replicate the IoW stages and the large crowds. In the summer we are booked on some big stages at other festivals, but IoW is the fairly early in the festival calendar and we have to rise to the occasion based on our past experiences. Some of my band have played on big stages, and they tell me its easier than the small intimate gigs where people are listening to every note and breath.”

Who are you most looking forward to seeing at the festival?

Hannah: “Personally, I am looking forward to seeing Sheryl Crow, Jessie J and Kasabian, but I could just reel off the entire weekend lineup as my musical influences are wide.”

Who do you feel should be on the lineup for next year?

Hannah: “Ed Sheeran and Taylor Swift are two of my favourite artists. I would love them to be at the IoW 2109, and in anticipation of my sensational debut this year, me, of course. Sorry, but I couldn’t resist a shameless bit of promotion.”


Alex Francis

 

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Image Credit: Alex Francis

 

Alex Francis’ emotive melding of rock and soul has spurned an organic rise to prominence that few singer-songwriters have experience. Alex released his debut EP “These Words” in summer 2017 which included singles ‘Make Believe’ and ‘The Last Time’. The EP was produced by Eddie Serifica (Jake Bugg). Alex’s latest EP ‘A Stronger Love’ was released in December and was produced by Gus Pirelli (Disclosure, Sam Smith) and mastered by Chris Kimsey (The Rolling Stones).

Alex provides an insight into how he prepared for the Isle of Wight. Having played the festival the previous year, the festival is no stranger to Alex, but trialling his latest tracks at the Isle of Wight is a bold move that shows a confidence in his ability that many wouldn’t wish to show on such a large platform first.

How would you describe yourself as an artist/band for those who haven’t heard of you?

My music is a blend of all sorts of influences, but many people like to place it somewhere in between rootsy rock and soul music influences.

How are you feeling in the build-up to your performance at the Isle of Wight?

I’m thrilled to back at the IOW Festival again, we had such an amazing time last year and the performance was a great opportunity to engage new people – hoping for much of the same this weekend!

What sort of preparation do you have as an artist for a festival of this size?

My band and I take great care in carefully constructing our set lists for every performance. My new single ‘Free’ arrives this Friday just as the IOW begins, so that will certainly be included along with tracks from my EP releases last year and a couple of more recently written songs. I love the challenge of bringing brand new music to listeners to see what engages best. This festival is an amazing platform to do so.

Who are you most looking forward to seeing at the festival? 

I’m really looking forward to catching Sheryl Crow on Sunday – massive fan and she’s got an incredible bank of amazing songs that I’m hoping I’ll hear plenty of! It will, of course, be a super proud moment watching my brother and his band on the main stage on Saturday, too.

Who do you feel should be on the lineup for next year?

Every year always boasts an amazing line up so I’m going to keep it ambiguous and wait and see what they can pull off! I’ll, of course, be hoping to make an appearance 😉


The Seamonsters

 

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Image Credit: The Seamonsters

 

The Seamonsters are an indie glitter band from Sheffield, driven by 80s inspired synths and angelic vocals. Comprising of Naomi Mann, Holly Thompson, Tassie Drobinski, Lauren Smith, Ella Taylor and Ciara Hurding; the six 18 and 19-year-olds are influenced by Pulp, Altered Images and Orange Juice along with more recent indie artists like Black Honey and The Wombats, creating catchy songs for dreamy dance floors.

Proving that youth doesn’t mean that you can’t absolutely outdo the vast majority of your competition, The Seamonsters rocked their way onto the line up for this year’s festival. The band have shown over the last year that they can provide a serious challenge to anyone else who is currently emerging. We look forward to reviewing future material by the band, but for now, have a look over their answers in response to their biggest festival slot so far.

How would you describe yourself as a band for those who haven’t heard of you? 

We often describe the three songs we’ve released so far as ‘indie glitter’ but our sound has definitely progressed since those tracks and I think that’s evident in our live performance. Our newer tracks (which we hope to release soon) are definitely taking us in a more experimental, 80s synth inspired direction.

How are you feeling in the build-up to your performance?

Soooo excited! This will be the biggest festival we’ve ever played at and we can’t wait. This Feeling and Pirate Studios have curated a really interesting lineup and their stage is a great addition to an already insane lineup and we’re so happy to be a part of it. Ask us the night before and we might be a bit more nervous but right now we just honestly cannot wait.

What sort of preparation do you have as an artist for a festival the size of this?

Rehearse lots and get a setlist we’re all happy with, we change our set based on how we’re feeling at the time and what we think will go down well at that event. When we practice before a gig we also perform a lot more instead of just sitting around playing our songs.

Who are you most looking forward to seeing at the festival?

We’re excited to have a dance to Nile Rodgers & Chic and to see Depeche Mode and Liam Gallagher on Saturday night. We’re also going to see Sophie & The Giants for the first time which we can’t wait for because we’ve heard so much about them. Would also recommend going to see our fellow Pirate Prodigy winners (YVES, Red Rum Club and Alex Ohm) to anyone going to the festival, all insanely talented!

Who do you feel should be on the line-up for next year?

In terms of small bands, Heavy Lids are a really great dream-pop band also from Sheffield, they’ve just released their first single and are getting a really positive response. Sheafs and Redfaces are also both great bands who are local to us and have and will continue to play big stages at festivals across the UK. For bigger bands, we all love Belle and Sebastian and they’re a great festival band and The Cure because they’re The Cure.


 

 

 

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