Nexus Meets… Moscato

A man of many talents, Moscato is skilled at folk, post-rock and synth-based sounds – to name but a few styles in his repertoire. We speak with the Italian artist about his single ‘Ljomi’, official music videos and much more!

What is the backstory to the single ‘Ljomi’?

‘Ljomi’ inspiration came from a walk at dawn. It is the description of a feeling, the impression of dissolving in the fog, like feeling suspended in mid-air and becoming wind.

Did you face any challenges when writing and recording ‘Ljomi’?

The song doesn’t have any words that describe a story, therefore, only through sounds could I recreate the atmosphere that had inspired it. From the writing until the arrangement phase, I worked to find a spacious sound with open chords, a great use of reverbs and sound layers that were not too invasive. In the studio, I tried to make the best use of the recording techniques of acoustic instruments and voices, which are the song’s backbone, in order to give depth and three-dimensionality to it. Avoiding the extensive use of effects made it too ethereal.

What is your creative process?

Usually, I get inspired by a feeling linked to a significant moment. I try expressing it through a melody and a harmony. When this process leads to a potential music piece, then I work on it by structuring and arranging it.



What about the music video for ‘Ljomi’, what can you tell us about that?

The video clip is a journey into the inner universe of each face that appears sequentially in the foreground. Each glance will tell its own story describing the spatiality of the song not as a physical place but as an interior dimension.

If you could change anything about the video what would it be?

I’m absolutely satisfied with each and every thing. The participation of those who lent their faces in the video went beyond my expectations. Every time I watch it the depth of their looks surprises me.

Describe you music in a single word.

Floating.

What do you hope people take from your music?

I would like people to abandon themselves to sounds, to let their imagination lead them into their own creative universe. Many have told me of using ‘Thamel’ as background for story writing or drawing – this made me happy and I wish this will happen also with ‘Ljomi’

What inspires you to make music?

I haven’t discovered it yet. Behind the pleasure and sense of completeness, I receive in writing, there is something I haven’t grasped clearly. Who knows if I ever will.

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